Logical Reasoning Test

The format of this test is rather uncommon, which can be advantageous because tasks that present subjects with intermediate amounts of novelty tend to be good measures of intelligence1. You are asked to infer the relationships between the words on the list and then to choose the best diagram to represent these relationships.

This Logical Reasoning Test has the potential to assess verbal reasoning as well as the ability to cope with relative novelty, which seems quite important to intelligence2.

Instructions:

For each question, indicate which diagram better expresses the relation between the three given words. The relations may not be as straightforward as it seems and you should take your time to think about them. This test has no time limit.

The best way to analyze each relation is to identify the word with a wider meaning and that could possibly encompass the others. Then you should question the relation between the remaining words. For instance: 

Is A always B/C? - If yes, then A will be inside B/C. If no, it will be separated.
Is A partially B/C? If yes, it will partially overlap with B/C. If no, it will be separated.
Is A never B/C? If yes, it will be separated from B/C. If no, one of the previous options has to apply.

The type of question may vary depending on the possible relation with the wider meaning word.

Examples: 

1. Means of transport - Taxi - Taxi driver

Means of transport is the word with the wider meaning. Therefore, you can take it as your base to compare the relation between the remaining words. 

A taxi is always a means of transport. Thus, its circle will be fully inside that of the means of transport. The taxi driver, however, has no relation to the other words. 

Is a taxi driver always a means of transport? - No
Is a taxi driver partially a means of transport? - No
Is a taxi driver never a means of transport - Yes. 

The circle for taxi driver will have to be completely separated from the other two. The diagram will have two circles one inside each other and a completely separate circle on the side.

2. Drinks - Wine - Beer

Drinks is the word with the wider meaning. 

Is wine always a drink? - Yes. The circle for wine will be inside the circle for Drinks.
Is beer always a drink? - Yes. The circle for beer will be inside the circle for Drinks.

Now you only need to establish the relation between Wine and Beer. Wine is not always beer and beer is not always wine. Wine is not partially beer and neither is beer partially wine. The last question is if wine is never beer and if beer is never wine, and the answer is yes for both.

Therefore, the circles of beer and wine do not overlap in any way. The diagram that better expresses the relation between the three words will have a larger circle (Drinks), with two smaller circles inside (Beer and Wine) separated from each other.  

Disclaimer:

This test is designed as an entertaining and educational tool. The results do not constitute a psychological or psychiatric evaluation of any kind and may not offer an accurate portrait of the mental fitness of the test taker. We do not guarantee the accuracy of the results and these should not be used as an indicator of the capacities of the individual for a specific purpose.
 
Responses may be recorded and used for research purposes or to be otherwise distributed. All responses are recorded anonymously. 

References:

1 Sternberg, J. & Gastel, J. (1989). If dancers ate their shoes: Inductive reasoning with factual and counterfactual premises. Memory & Cognition. 17 (1), 1-10

2 Sternberg, R. J. (1985). BeyoruJIQ: A triarchic theory of human intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press.